Dr. Crystal Walker ● Dr. Mariah Frazier ● Dr. Rebecca Parr
6943 West 37th Street North ● Wichita, KS 67205
New Patients: 316-747-4144
Current Patients: 316-613-2077
Bird

Incoming!! When to Expect Baby Teeth

added on: February 18, 2015

How baby's teeth eruptWhen we’re born, most of us have primary (baby) teeth that are sitting, waiting, ready to burst through our gums as we grow a bit older. While baby teeth eruption dates do vary from person to person, at our Wichita pediatric dental office, we’ve  put together a guide to provide you with a rough idea of when to expect your little one’s teeth to make an entrance.

A general rule of thumb is to expect about four teeth every six months. Here’s the breakdown of which teeth should make their appearance when.

6-12 Months – Typically baby’s first teeth, the two front bottom and top teeth (central incisors) should be coming in soon.

10-16 Months – The central incisors’ neighbors, the lateral incisors, usually begin to show during this time.

16-23 Months – Time for some canines (also known as the “pointy” teeth)! At the same time, some first molars (next to the “pointy teeth”) may also break through.

23-33 Months – The last of the baby teeth, the second molars, should start to show and fully erupt.

What seems like minutes later, but is actually usually three to five years, your little one will start losing teeth. Typically around age six or seven your child can expect her first visit from the Tooth Fairy and permanent adult teeth will begin to push through.

When your child’s first teeth begin to erupt, usually around six months, call our pediatric dental office in Wichita to schedule her first dental appointment. We’ll check on the teeth that have broken through the gum line and make sure there are no concerns for future dental problems.

Want more of a visual? Head on over to the American Dental Association’s website http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/e/eruption-charts  and check out their handy teeth eruption chart.

Welcoming patients from Wichita, Maize, and Goddard.